Thursday, May 2, 2013

UFO and Alien Hoaxes: Tips on How to Debunk a Hoax


One thing that does not help in the research of UFOs and extraterrestrials is hoaxes.  They cloud serious research with time being wasted on debunking them and in the end crush our hopes.
I suppose the only good thing that a hoax can do is provide it's audience with some form of entertainment.
For example, the famous Alien Autopsy. Yep, sorry to break the news, but it wasn't real. As much as I wish it would have been, the man that released the film, Ray Santilli, finally admitted it was a hoax in 2006. That's about ten years after it's release to television networks in the 1990's where it played in 32 countries.
It's a pretty good film. I've seen it before. I always watch it imagining it to be real and then it grosses me out, but then I wonder; "If Santilli would have never come forward admitting the film to be fake, would people still be thinking it's real?"
Further information revealed that Santilli was in procession of some modern quality photographs taken during the filming of the autopsy. He never handed them over to film experts because the photograph's clear quality revealed that the alien's body was made out of latex. So, maybe eventually the film would of been debunked had Santilli never said anything or maybe he was in danger of people from behind the scenes coming forward and admitting it to be fake. Watch the autopsy below and pretend it came to you with no explanation. Would you think it was real? Or can you spot mistakes in accuracy?



As I was searching for the Alien Autopsy footage to embed in to this post, I noticed that every version that had been uploaded to YouTube does not mention that it's fake or a re-enactment. Could there be people out there that still don't know? This is the kind of stuff that needs to be straightened out in order for people to get serious about researching UFOs and extraterrestrials.

Here is a list of tips that might help in debunking a hoax before the hoax gets out of hand.
  • What or who is the source of the content?-  (example) Did it come from NASA or USAF? If so, then it might have a good deal of credibility. Did it come from someone with some strange sic-fi sounding screen name? If so, then there is a good chance it's probably fake...
  • What is the back story or does it even have a story?- Usually a true story is very simple and straight forward. Not too much information or detail and not too less. Most of the time hoaxes have really elaborate backstories to go with their content because they are trying to sell it to the audience as being "real". Other times a hoax will have no explanation, no backstory which also could be a red flag. Someone doesn't want to say too much to ruin the illusion. 
  • Is it accurate- This might be kind of a tricky thing to figure out. Sometimes debunkers have to consult video or photograph experts or experts in the respective medical and science fields, but you don't have to be a rocket scientist to use your common sense. If something looks like a car's hubcap flying through the air, it probably is. 
  • Research! The most important key to knowing the truth. Go ahead and google an unexplained photograph, video or story and add "debunked" on the end of your search. There is probably a whole forum of people who have already researched the content and found the truth. 
Don't be embarrassed if you find out something you thought was real turns out to be fake. It happens to us all. Also, don't be embarrassed if something you thought was fake, turns out to be REAL!

For fun, I have gathered together my favorite hoaxes because of their craftsmanship. I even added my own fake UFO photography to the mix. Although, the first time I published my fake UFO photographs, I made sure to let people know that they were fake. Enjoy:








Billy Meier photograph from 1975. His photos have 
never been officially debunked. However, I know it is
possible to create a fake UFO picture without using  
photoshop. I created the ones below with this technique.


My fake UFO photographs.